Tax Tips

New 100-percent depreciation deduction benefits business taxpayers

IRS Tax Reform Tax Tip 2018-157, October 10, 2018

Tax reform legislation passed in December 2017 includes changes that affect businesses. One of these changes allows businesses to write off most depreciable business assets in the year they place them in service.

Here are some facts about this deduction to help businesses better understand how to claim it:

  • The 100-percent depreciation deduction generally applies to depreciable business assets with a recovery period of 20 years or less and certain other property.
  • Machinery, equipment, computers, appliances and furniture generally qualify.
  • The 100-percent depreciation deduction applies to qualifying property acquired and placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017.
  • Taxpayers who elect out of the 100-percent depreciation deduction for a class of property must do so on a timely filed return. Those who have already timely filed their 2017 return and did not elect out can still do so. These taxpayers have six months from the original filing deadline to file an amended return. For calendar-year corporations, this means
    Oct. 15, 2018.
  • The IRS issued proposed regulations with guidance on what property qualifies and rules for qualified film, television and live theatrical productions, and certain plants.
  • For details on claiming the 100-percent depreciation deduction or electing out of claiming it, taxpayers should refer to the proposed regulations or the instructions to Form 4562, Depreciation and Amortization.

Here are facts to help taxpayers understand the different filing statuses

IRS Tax Tip 2018-153, October 2, 2018

Taxpayers don’t typically think about their filing status until they file their taxes. However, a taxpayer’s status could change during the year, so it’s always a good time for a taxpayer to learn about  the different filing statuses and which one they should use.

It’s important a taxpayer uses the right filing status because it can affect the amount of tax they owe for the year. It may even determine if they must file a tax return at all. Taxpayers should keep in mind that their marital status on Dec. 31 is their status for the whole year.

Sometimes more than one filing status may apply to taxpayers. When that happens, taxpayers should choose the one that allows them to pay the least amount of tax.

Here’s a list of the five filing statuses and a description of who claims them:

  • Single. Normally this status is for taxpayers who aren’t married, or who are divorced or legally separated under state law.
  • Married Filing Jointly. If taxpayers are married, they can file a joint tax return. When a spouse passes away, the widowed spouse can usually file a joint return for that year.
  • Married Filing Separately. A married couple can choose to file two separate tax returns. This may benefit them if it results in less tax owed than if they file a joint tax return. Taxpayers may want to prepare their taxes both ways before they choose. They can also use this status if each wants to be responsible only for their own tax.
  • Head of Household. In most cases, this status applies to a taxpayer who is not married, but there are some special rules. For example, the taxpayer must have paid more than half the cost of keeping up a home for themselves and a qualifying person. Taxpayers should check all the rules and make sure they qualify to use this status.
  • Qualifying Widow(er) with Dependent Child. This status may apply to a taxpayer if their spouse died during one of the previous two years and they have a dependent child. Other conditions also apply.